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Using a Pip Value Calculator in Forex Trading

Using a Pip Value Calculator in Forex Trading submitted by HowForexTradingWorks to Forex [link] [comments]

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part II

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part II
Firstly, thanks for the overwhelming comments and feedback. Genuinely really appreciated. I am pleased 500+ of you find it useful.
If you didn't read the first post you can do so here: risk management part I. You'll need to do so in order to make sense of the topic.
As ever please comment/reply below with questions or feedback and I'll do my best to get back to you.
Part II
  • Letting stops breathe
  • When to change a stop
  • Entering and exiting winning positions
  • Risk:reward ratios
  • Risk-adjusted returns

Letting stops breathe

We talked earlier about giving a position enough room to breathe so it is not stopped out in day-to-day noise.
Let’s consider the chart below and imagine you had a trailing stop. It would be super painful to miss out on the wider move just because you left a stop that was too tight.

Imagine being long and stopped out on a meaningless retracement ... ouch!
One simple technique is simply to look at your chosen chart - let’s say daily bars. And then look at previous trends and use the measuring tool. Those generally look something like this and then you just click and drag to measure.
For example if we wanted to bet on a downtrend on the chart above we might look at the biggest retracement on the previous uptrend. That max drawdown was about 100 pips or just under 1%. So you’d want your stop to be able to withstand at least that.
If market conditions have changed - for example if CVIX has risen - and daily ranges are now higher you should incorporate that. If you know a big event is coming up you might think about that, too. The human brain is a remarkable tool and the power of the eye-ball method is not to be dismissed. This is how most discretionary traders do it.
There are also more analytical approaches.
Some look at the Average True Range (ATR). This attempts to capture the volatility of a pair, typically averaged over a number of sessions. It looks at three separate measures and takes the largest reading. Think of this as a moving average of how much a pair moves.
For example, below shows the daily move in EURUSD was around 60 pips before spiking to 140 pips in March. Conditions were clearly far more volatile in March. Accordingly, you would need to leave your stop further away in March and take a correspondingly smaller position size.

ATR is available on pretty much all charting systems
Professional traders tend to use standard deviation as a measure of volatility instead of ATR. There are advantages and disadvantages to both. Averages are useful but can be misleading when regimes switch (see above chart).
Once you have chosen a measure of volatility, stop distance can then be back-tested and optimised. For example does 2x ATR work best or 5x ATR for a given style and time horizon?
Discretionary traders may still eye-ball the ATR or standard deviation to get a feeling for how it has changed over time and what ‘normal’ feels like for a chosen study period - daily, weekly, monthly etc.

Reasons to change a stop

As a general rule you should be disciplined and not change your stops. Remember - losers average losers. This is really hard at first and we’re going to look at that in more detail later.
There are some good reasons to modify stops but they are rare.
One reason is if another risk management process demands you stop trading and close positions. We’ll look at this later. In that case just close out your positions at market and take the loss/gains as they are.
Another is event risk. If you have some big upcoming data like Non Farm Payrolls that you know can move the market +/- 150 pips and you have no edge going into the release then many traders will take off or scale down their positions. They’ll go back into the positions when the data is out and the market has quietened down after fifteen minutes or so. This is a matter of some debate - many traders consider it a coin toss and argue you win some and lose some and it all averages out.
Trailing stops can also be used to ‘lock in’ profits. We looked at those before. As the trade moves in your favour (say up if you are long) the stop loss ratchets with it. This means you may well end up ‘stopping out’ at a profit - as per the below example.

The mighty trailing stop loss order
It is perfectly reasonable to have your stop loss move in the direction of PNL. This is not exposing you to more risk than you originally were comfortable with. It is taking less and less risk as the trade moves in your favour. Trend-followers in particular love trailing stops.
One final question traders ask is what they should do if they get stopped out but still like the trade. Should they try the same trade again a day later for the same reasons? Nope. Look for a different trade rather than getting emotionally wed to the original idea.
Let’s say a particular stock looked cheap based on valuation metrics yesterday, you bought, it went down and you got stopped out. Well, it is going to look even better on those same metrics today. Maybe the market just doesn’t respect value at the moment and is driven by momentum. Wait it out.
Otherwise, why even have a stop in the first place?

Entering and exiting winning positions

Take profits are the opposite of stop losses. They are also resting orders, left with the broker, to automatically close your position if it reaches a certain price.
Imagine I’m long EURUSD at 1.1250. If it hits a previous high of 1.1400 (150 pips higher) I will leave a sell order to take profit and close the position.
The rookie mistake on take profits is to take profit too early. One should start from the assumption that you will win on no more than half of your trades. Therefore you will need to ensure that you win more on the ones that work than you lose on those that don’t.

Sad to say but incredibly common: retail traders often take profits way too early
This is going to be the exact opposite of what your emotions want you to do. We are going to look at that in the Psychology of Trading chapter.
Remember: let winners run. Just like stops you need to know in advance the level where you will close out at a profit. Then let the trade happen. Don’t override yourself and let emotions force you to take a small profit. A classic mistake to avoid.
The trader puts on a trade and it almost stops out before rebounding. As soon as it is slightly in the money they spook and cut out, instead of letting it run to their original take profit. Do not do this.

Entering positions with limit orders

That covers exiting a position but how about getting into one?
Take profits can also be left speculatively to enter a position. Sometimes referred to as “bids” (buy orders) or “offers” (sell orders). Imagine the price is 1.1250 and the recent low is 1.1205.
You might wish to leave a bid around 1.2010 to enter a long position, if the market reaches that price. This way you don’t need to sit at the computer and wait.
Again, typically traders will use tech analysis to identify attractive levels. Again - other traders will cluster with your orders. Just like the stop loss we need to bake that in.
So this time if we know everyone is going to buy around the recent low of 1.1205 we might leave the take profit bit a little bit above there at 1.1210 to ensure it gets done. Sure it costs 5 more pips but how mad would you be if the low was 1.1207 and then it rallied a hundred points and you didn’t have the trade on?!
There are two more methods that traders often use for entering a position.
Scaling in is one such technique. Let’s imagine that you think we are in a long-term bulltrend for AUDUSD but experiencing a brief retracement. You want to take a total position of 500,000 AUD and don’t have a strong view on the current price action.
You might therefore leave a series of five bids of 100,000. As the price moves lower each one gets hit. The nice thing about scaling in is it reduces pressure on you to pick the perfect level. Of course the risk is that not all your orders get hit before the price moves higher and you have to trade at-market.
Pyramiding is the second technique. Pyramiding is for take profits what a trailing stop loss is to regular stops. It is especially common for momentum traders.

Pyramiding into a position means buying more as it goes in your favour
Again let’s imagine we’re bullish AUDUSD and want to take a position of 500,000 AUD.
Here we add 100,000 when our first signal is reached. Then we add subsequent clips of 100,000 when the trade moves in our favour. We are waiting for confirmation that the move is correct.
Obviously this is quite nice as we humans love trading when it goes in our direction. However, the drawback is obvious: we haven’t had the full amount of risk on from the start of the trend.
You can see the attractions and drawbacks of both approaches. It is best to experiment and choose techniques that work for your own personal psychology as these will be the easiest for you to stick with and build a disciplined process around.

Risk:reward and win ratios

Be extremely skeptical of people who claim to win on 80% of trades. Most traders will win on roughly 50% of trades and lose on 50% of trades. This is why risk management is so important!
Once you start keeping a trading journal you’ll be able to see how the win/loss ratio looks for you. Until then, assume you’re typical and that every other trade will lose money.
If that is the case then you need to be sure you make more on the wins than you lose on the losses. You can see the effect of this below.

A combination of win % and risk:reward ratio determine if you are profitable
A typical rule of thumb is that a ratio of 1:3 works well for most traders.
That is, if you are prepared to risk 100 pips on your stop you should be setting a take profit at a level that would return you 300 pips.
One needn’t be religious about these numbers - 11 pips and 28 pips would be perfectly fine - but they are a guideline.
Again - you should still use technical analysis to find meaningful chart levels for both the stop and take profit. Don’t just blindly take your stop distance and do 3x the pips on the other side as your take profit. Use the ratio to set approximate targets and then look for a relevant resistance or support level in that kind of region.

Risk-adjusted returns

Not all returns are equal. Suppose you are examining the track record of two traders. Now, both have produced a return of 14% over the year. Not bad!
The first trader, however, made hundreds of small bets throughout the year and his cumulative PNL looked like the left image below.
The second trader made just one bet — he sold CADJPY at the start of the year — and his PNL looked like the right image below with lots of large drawdowns and volatility.
Would you rather have the first trading record or the second?
If you were investing money and betting on who would do well next year which would you choose? Of course all sensible people would choose the first trader. Yet if you look only at returns one cannot distinguish between the two. Both are up 14% at that point in time. This is where the Sharpe ratio helps .
A high Sharpe ratio indicates that a portfolio has better risk-adjusted performance. One cannot sensibly compare returns without considering the risk taken to earn that return.
If I can earn 80% of the return of another investor at only 50% of the risk then a rational investor should simply leverage me at 2x and enjoy 160% of the return at the same level of risk.
This is very important in the context of Execution Advisor algorithms (EAs) that are popular in the retail community. You must evaluate historic performance by its risk-adjusted return — not just the nominal return. Incidentally look at the Sharpe ratio of ones that have been live for a year or more ...
Otherwise an EA developer could produce two EAs: the first simply buys at 1000:1 leverage on January 1st ; and the second sells in the same manner. At the end of the year, one of them will be discarded and the other will look incredible. Its risk-adjusted return, however, would be abysmal and the odds of repeated success are similarly poor.

Sharpe ratio

The Sharpe ratio works like this:
  • It takes the average returns of your strategy;
  • It deducts from these the risk-free rate of return i.e. the rate anyone could have got by investing in US government bonds with very little risk;
  • It then divides this total return by its own volatility - the more smooth the return the higher and better the Sharpe, the more volatile the lower and worse the Sharpe.
For example, say the return last year was 15% with a volatility of 10% and US bonds are trading at 2%. That gives (15-2)/10 or a Sharpe ratio of 1.3. As a rule of thumb a Sharpe ratio of above 0.5 would be considered decent for a discretionary retail trader. Above 1 is excellent.
You don’t really need to know how to calculate Sharpe ratios. Good trading software will do this for you. It will either be available in the system by default or you can add a plug-in.

VAR

VAR is another useful measure to help with drawdowns. It stands for Value at Risk. Normally people will use 99% VAR (conservative) or 95% VAR (aggressive). Let’s say you’re long EURUSD and using 95% VAR. The system will look at the historic movement of EURUSD. It might spit out a number of -1.2%.

A 5% VAR of -1.2% tells you you should expect to lose 1.2% on 5% of days, whilst 95% of days should be better than that
This means it is expected that on 5 days out of 100 (hence the 95%) the portfolio will lose 1.2% or more. This can help you manage your capital by taking appropriately sized positions. Typically you would look at VAR across your portfolio of trades rather than trade by trade.
Sharpe ratios and VAR don’t give you the whole picture, though. Legendary fund manager, Howard Marks of Oaktree, notes that, while tools like VAR and Sharpe ratios are helpful and absolutely necessary, the best investors will also overlay their own judgment.
Investors can calculate risk metrics like VaR and Sharpe ratios (we use them at Oaktree; they’re the best tools we have), but they shouldn’t put too much faith in them. The bottom line for me is that risk management should be the responsibility of every participant in the investment process, applying experience, judgment and knowledge of the underlying investments.Howard Marks of Oaktree Capital
What he’s saying is don’t misplace your common sense. Do use these tools as they are helpful. However, you cannot fully rely on them. Both assume a normal distribution of returns. Whereas in real life you get “black swans” - events that should supposedly happen only once every thousand years but which actually seem to happen fairly often.
These outlier events are often referred to as “tail risk”. Don’t make the mistake of saying “well, the model said…” - overlay what the model is telling you with your own common sense and good judgment.

Coming up in part III

Available here
Squeezes and other risks
Market positioning
Bet correlation
Crap trades, timeouts and monthly limits

***
Disclaimer:This content is not investment advice and you should not place any reliance on it. The views expressed are the author's own and should not be attributed to any other person, including their employer.
submitted by getmrmarket to Forex [link] [comments]

Forex trader looking to start trading Crytpo as well (help with brokers and lot sizes?)

Hey there -- I'm no stranger to trading. I trade Forex and Futures. I'm also not a complete newb to cryptocurrency in general, but I am when it comes to actively trading it.
To me, it just seems like Forex but with crypto and I'd really like to start building up my crypto holdings by "trading up" my account rather than solely just converting cash into crypto over time.
What is confusing me a little bit is lot sizing, leverage, and the right brokers to use.
I was eyeing CryptoAltum if anybody has experience with that?
Although I'd prefer something I can trade with Tradingview (my preferred charting / execution platform).
Aslo -- lot sizing.
With Forex it's pretty simple...
1,000 = micro-lot (approx. 10 cents per pip value on majors)
10,000 = mini-lot (approx $1 per pip value on majors)
100,000 = standard lot (approx $10 per pip value on majors).
But how is lot sizing determined with Crypto pairs?
I'm interested in trading crypto-against-crypto (for example LTC/BTC).
Is there an online calculator somewhere where I can easily determine the value per pip (or "tick"?) based on leverage and lot size?
Sorry if this has been answered a bazillion times.
submitted by AHoomanBeanz to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

H1 Backtest of ParallaxFX's BBStoch system

Disclaimer: None of this is financial advice. I have no idea what I'm doing. Please do your own research or you will certainly lose money. I'm not a statistician, data scientist, well-seasoned trader, or anything else that would qualify me to make statements such as the below with any weight behind them. Take them for the incoherent ramblings that they are.
TL;DR at the bottom for those not interested in the details.
This is a bit of a novel, sorry about that. It was mostly for getting my own thoughts organized, but if even one person reads the whole thing I will feel incredibly accomplished.

Background

For those of you not familiar, please see the various threads on this trading system here. I can't take credit for this system, all glory goes to ParallaxFX!
I wanted to see how effective this system was at H1 for a couple of reasons: 1) My current broker is TD Ameritrade - their Forex minimum is a mini lot, and I don't feel comfortable enough yet with the risk to trade mini lots on the higher timeframes(i.e. wider pip swings) that ParallaxFX's system uses, so I wanted to see if I could scale it down. 2) I'm fairly impatient, so I don't like to wait days and days with my capital tied up just to see if a trade is going to win or lose.
This does mean it requires more active attention since you are checking for setups once an hour instead of once a day or every 4-6 hours, but the upside is that you trade more often this way so you end up winning or losing faster and moving onto the next trade. Spread does eat more of the trade this way, but I'll cover this in my data below - it ends up not being a problem.
I looked at data from 6/11 to 7/3 on all pairs with a reasonable spread(pairs listed at bottom above the TL;DR). So this represents about 3-4 weeks' worth of trading. I used mark(mid) price charts. Spreadsheet link is below for anyone that's interested.

System Details

I'm pretty much using ParallaxFX's system textbook, but since there are a few options in his writeups, I'll include all the discretionary points here:

And now for the fun. Results!

As you can see, a higher target ended up with higher profit despite a much lower winrate. This is partially just how things work out with profit targets in general, but there's an additional point to consider in our case: the spread. Since we are trading on a lower timeframe, there is less overall price movement and thus the spread takes up a much larger percentage of the trade than it would if you were trading H4, Daily or Weekly charts. You can see exactly how much it accounts for each trade in my spreadsheet if you're interested. TDA does not have the best spreads, so you could probably improve these results with another broker.
EDIT: I grabbed typical spreads from other brokers, and turns out while TDA is pretty competitive on majors, their minors/crosses are awful! IG beats them by 20-40% and Oanda beats them 30-60%! Using IG spreads for calculations increased profits considerably (another 5% on top) and Oanda spreads increased profits massively (another 15%!). Definitely going to be considering another broker than TDA for this strategy. Plus that'll allow me to trade micro-lots, so I can be more granular(and thus accurate) with my position sizing and compounding.

A Note on Spread

As you can see in the data, there were scenarios where the spread was 80% of the overall size of the trade(the size of the confirmation candle that you draw your fibonacci retracements over), which would obviously cut heavily into your profits.
Removing any trades where the spread is more than 50% of the trade width improved profits slightly without removing many trades, but this is almost certainly just coincidence on a small sample size. Going below 40% and even down to 30% starts to cut out a lot of trades for the less-common pairs, but doesn't actually change overall profits at all(~1% either way).
However, digging all the way down to 25% starts to really make some movement. Profit at the -161.8% TP level jumps up to 37.94% if you filter out anything with a spread that is more than 25% of the trade width! And this even keeps the sample size fairly large at 187 total trades.
You can get your profits all the way up to 48.43% at the -161.8% TP level if you filter all the way down to only trades where spread is less than 15% of the trade width, however your sample size gets much smaller at that point(108 trades) so I'm not sure I would trust that as being accurate in the long term.
Overall based on this data, I'm going to only take trades where the spread is less than 25% of the trade width. This may bias my trades more towards the majors, which would mean a lot more correlated trades as well(more on correlation below), but I think it is a reasonable precaution regardless.

Time of Day

Time of day had an interesting effect on trades. In a totally predictable fashion, a vast majority of setups occurred during the London and New York sessions: 5am-12pm Eastern. However, there was one outlier where there were many setups on the 11PM bar - and the winrate was about the same as the big hours in the London session. No idea why this hour in particular - anyone have any insight? That's smack in the middle of the Tokyo/Sydney overlap, not at the open or close of either.
On many of the hour slices I have a feeling I'm just dealing with small number statistics here since I didn't have a lot of data when breaking it down by individual hours. But here it is anyway - for all TP levels, these three things showed up(all in Eastern time):
I don't have any reason to think these timeframes would maintain this behavior over the long term. They're almost certainly meaningless. EDIT: When you de-dup highly correlated trades, the number of trades in these timeframes really drops, so from this data there is no reason to think these timeframes would be any different than any others in terms of winrate.
That being said, these time frames work out for me pretty well because I typically sleep 12am-7am Eastern time. So I automatically avoid the 5am-6am timeframe, and I'm awake for the majority of this system's setups.

Moving stops up to breakeven

This section goes against everything I know and have ever heard about trade management. Please someone find something wrong with my data. I'd love for someone to check my formulas, but I realize that's a pretty insane time commitment to ask of a bunch of strangers.
Anyways. What I found was that for these trades moving stops up...basically at all...actually reduced the overall profitability.
One of the data points I collected while charting was where the price retraced back to after hitting a certain milestone. i.e. once the price hit the -61.8% profit level, how far back did it retrace before hitting the -100% profit level(if at all)? And same goes for the -100% profit level - how far back did it retrace before hitting the -161.8% profit level(if at all)?
Well, some complex excel formulas later and here's what the results appear to be. Emphasis on appears because I honestly don't believe it. I must have done something wrong here, but I've gone over it a hundred times and I can't find anything out of place.
Now, you might think exactly what I did when looking at these numbers: oof, the spread killed us there right? Because even when you move your SL to 0%, you still end up paying the spread, so it's not truly "breakeven". And because we are trading on a lower timeframe, the spread can be pretty hefty right?
Well even when I manually modified the data so that the spread wasn't subtracted(i.e. "Breakeven" was truly +/- 0), things don't look a whole lot better, and still way worse than the passive trade management method of leaving your stops in place and letting it run. And that isn't even a realistic scenario because to adjust out the spread you'd have to move your stoploss inside the candle edge by at least the spread amount, meaning it would almost certainly be triggered more often than in the data I collected(which was purely based on the fib levels and mark price). Regardless, here are the numbers for that scenario:
From a literal standpoint, what I see behind this behavior is that 44 of the 69 breakeven trades(65%!) ended up being profitable to -100% after retracing deeply(but not to the original SL level), which greatly helped offset the purely losing trades better than the partial profit taken at -61.8%. And 36 went all the way back to -161.8% after a deep retracement without hitting the original SL. Anyone have any insight into this? Is this a problem with just not enough data? It seems like enough trades that a pattern should emerge, but again I'm no expert.
I also briefly looked at moving stops to other lower levels (78.6%, 61.8%, 50%, 38.2%, 23.6%), but that didn't improve things any. No hard data to share as I only took a quick look - and I still might have done something wrong overall.
The data is there to infer other strategies if anyone would like to dig in deep(more explanation on the spreadsheet below). I didn't do other combinations because the formulas got pretty complicated and I had already answered all the questions I was looking to answer.

2-Candle vs Confirmation Candle Stops

Another interesting point is that the original system has the SL level(for stop entries) just at the outer edge of the 2-candle pattern that makes up the system. Out of pure laziness, I set up my stops just based on the confirmation candle. And as it turns out, that is much a much better way to go about it.
Of the 60 purely losing trades, only 9 of them(15%) would go on to be winners with stops on the 2-candle formation. Certainly not enough to justify the extra loss and/or reduced profits you are exposing yourself to in every single other trade by setting a wider SL.
Oddly, in every single scenario where the wider stop did save the trade, it ended up going all the way to the -161.8% profit level. Still, not nearly worth it.

Correlated Trades

As I've said many times now, I'm really not qualified to be doing an analysis like this. This section in particular.
Looking at shared currency among the pairs traded, 74 of the trades are correlated. Quite a large group, but it makes sense considering the sort of moves we're looking for with this system.
This means you are opening yourself up to more risk if you were to trade on every signal since you are technically trading with the same underlying sentiment on each different pair. For example, GBP/USD and AUD/USD moving together almost certainly means it's due to USD moving both pairs, rather than GBP and AUD both moving the same size and direction coincidentally at the same time. So if you were to trade both signals, you would very likely win or lose both trades - meaning you are actually risking double what you'd normally risk(unless you halve both positions which can be a good option, and is discussed in ParallaxFX's posts and in various other places that go over pair correlation. I won't go into detail about those strategies here).
Interestingly though, 17 of those apparently correlated trades ended up with different wins/losses.
Also, looking only at trades that were correlated, winrate is 83%/70%/55% (for the three TP levels).
Does this give some indication that the same signal on multiple pairs means the signal is stronger? That there's some strong underlying sentiment driving it? Or is it just a matter of too small a sample size? The winrate isn't really much higher than the overall winrates, so that makes me doubt it is statistically significant.
One more funny tidbit: EUCAD netted the lowest overall winrate: 30% to even the -61.8% TP level on 10 trades. Seems like that is just a coincidence and not enough data, but dang that's a sucky losing streak.
EDIT: WOW I spent some time removing correlated trades manually and it changed the results quite a bit. Some thoughts on this below the results. These numbers also include the other "What I will trade" filters. I added a new worksheet to my data to show what I ended up picking.
To do this, I removed correlated trades - typically by choosing those whose spread had a lower % of the trade width since that's objective and something I can see ahead of time. Obviously I'd like to only keep the winning trades, but I won't know that during the trade. This did reduce the overall sample size down to a level that I wouldn't otherwise consider to be big enough, but since the results are generally consistent with the overall dataset, I'm not going to worry about it too much.
I may also use more discretionary methods(support/resistance, quality of indecision/confirmation candles, news/sentiment for the pairs involved, etc) to filter out correlated trades in the future. But as I've said before I'm going for a pretty mechanical system.
This brought the 3 TP levels and even the breakeven strategies much closer together in overall profit. It muted the profit from the high R:R strategies and boosted the profit from the low R:R strategies. This tells me pair correlation was skewing my data quite a bit, so I'm glad I dug in a little deeper. Fortunately my original conclusion to use the -161.8 TP level with static stops is still the winner by a good bit, so it doesn't end up changing my actions.
There were a few times where MANY (6-8) correlated pairs all came up at the same time, so it'd be a crapshoot to an extent. And the data showed this - often then won/lost together, but sometimes they did not. As an arbitrary rule, the more correlations, the more trades I did end up taking(and thus risking). For example if there were 3-5 correlations, I might take the 2 "best" trades given my criteria above. 5+ setups and I might take the best 3 trades, even if the pairs are somewhat correlated.
I have no true data to back this up, but to illustrate using one example: if AUD/JPY, AUD/USD, CAD/JPY, USD/CAD all set up at the same time (as they did, along with a few other pairs on 6/19/20 9:00 AM), can you really say that those are all the same underlying movement? There are correlations between the different correlations, and trying to filter for that seems rough. Although maybe this is a known thing, I'm still pretty green to Forex - someone please enlighten me if so! I might have to look into this more statistically, but it would be pretty complex to analyze quantitatively, so for now I'm going with my gut and just taking a few of the "best" trades out of the handful.
Overall, I'm really glad I went further on this. The boosting of the B/E strategies makes me trust my calculations on those more since they aren't so far from the passive management like they were with the raw data, and that really had me wondering what I did wrong.

What I will trade

Putting all this together, I am going to attempt to trade the following(demo for a bit to make sure I have the hang of it, then for keeps):
Looking at the data for these rules, test results are:
I'll be sure to let everyone know how it goes!

Other Technical Details

Raw Data

Here's the spreadsheet for anyone that'd like it. (EDIT: Updated some of the setups from the last few days that have fully played out now. I also noticed a few typos, but nothing major that would change the overall outcomes. Regardless, I am currently reviewing every trade to ensure they are accurate.UPDATE: Finally all done. Very few corrections, no change to results.)
I have some explanatory notes below to help everyone else understand the spiraled labyrinth of a mind that put the spreadsheet together.

Insanely detailed spreadsheet notes

For you real nerds out there. Here's an explanation of what each column means:

Pairs

  1. AUD/CAD
  2. AUD/CHF
  3. AUD/JPY
  4. AUD/NZD
  5. AUD/USD
  6. CAD/CHF
  7. CAD/JPY
  8. CHF/JPY
  9. EUAUD
  10. EUCAD
  11. EUCHF
  12. EUGBP
  13. EUJPY
  14. EUNZD
  15. EUUSD
  16. GBP/AUD
  17. GBP/CAD
  18. GBP/CHF
  19. GBP/JPY
  20. GBP/NZD
  21. GBP/USD
  22. NZD/CAD
  23. NZD/CHF
  24. NZD/JPY
  25. NZD/USD
  26. USD/CAD
  27. USD/CHF
  28. USD/JPY

TL;DR

Based on the reasonable rules I discovered in this backtest:

Demo Trading Results

Since this post, I started demo trading this system assuming a 5k capital base and risking ~1% per trade. I've added the details to my spreadsheet for anyone interested. The results are pretty similar to the backtest when you consider real-life conditions/timing are a bit different. I missed some trades due to life(work, out of the house, etc), so that brought my total # of trades and thus overall profit down, but the winrate is nearly identical. I also closed a few trades early due to various reasons(not liking the price action, seeing support/resistance emerge, etc).
A quick note is that TD's paper trade system fills at the mid price for both stop and limit orders, so I had to subtract the spread from the raw trade values to get the true profit/loss amount for each trade.
I'm heading out of town next week, then after that it'll be time to take this sucker live!

Live Trading Results

I started live-trading this system on 8/10, and almost immediately had a string of losses much longer than either my backtest or demo period. Murphy's law huh? Anyways, that has me spooked so I'm doing a longer backtest before I start risking more real money. It's going to take me a little while due to the volume of trades, but I'll likely make a new post once I feel comfortable with that and start live trading again.
submitted by ForexBorex to Forex [link] [comments]

Risk management on low value accounts

I’m looking to start trading forex and have been running trial accounts for the last few months just to make sure I can consistently turn my initial investment into a decent profit. I’ve no desire to make money quick and fully expect it to be a long process of interments gains (and losses).
I think I’m nearly ready to take the step to using a real deposit - my only concern is that my initial investment is only planned to be about £150 - I know generally a bigger investment is safer but I’m not keen to risk too big a slice of my monthly income having never traded with real capital. With this in mind, calculating stop losses at 1/2% is difficult as a pair can move £1/2 in a matter of pips so I’ve either got to be 100% sure that a trade is going in the right direction immediately, or risk stop lossing preemptively to protect a few percent.
Can anyone offer any advice as to how to run risk management strategies on a low value account?
submitted by BigfootSmallhands to Forex [link] [comments]

Forex Trading

To identify the maximum risk size of trade, you should find the distance between your stop loss and your entry. Therefore, you should determine the pips and the lot of size to calculate the ultimate risk in the dollar value. Risk per trade in currency value helps the trader to stay consistent with the maximum tolerable losses.
To Calculate the Position Size in Forex, you need to know:
How much money you have invested in your trading account
Percentage of your investment you are willing to risk
The distance of the entry price and the stop loss of your trade
Pip value per a standard lot of a currency pair.
#forexsignals #stockmarket #forexlifestyle #forexsignal #profits #forexprofit
submitted by GraceLeow to u/GraceLeow [link] [comments]

Website that calculates difference between two values in a currency pair (to calculate distance of stop loss from entry in pips)?

I use the Babypips trade size calculator and I need to input my stop loss as pips each time as a variable. I want to switch to MT4 but it doesn’t automatically show you how many pips your stop loss is when you enter a value in whereas Oanda’s app does. Is there any website to quickly calculate how many pips a certain drop in price is for Forex?
submitted by TastelessHurricane to Forex [link] [comments]

Position sizing forex help

I suppose it's been asked before, but unfortunately couldn't see it on reddit if it had ever been asked. Anyways, I'm new to Forex trading, and started grasping some few concepts from here and there. Getting straight to the point, the position size formula is as follows:
Account at Risk = Pip(s) at Risk x Pip's Value x Position size
Based on the formula above I guess everyone only works on to find the position size rather than account at risk. So, for instance if I have $300 account, risking 1 percent ($3) with a pip value of $10/pip with pips at risk at 49 pips and plugged every value in the formula above; my position size would be 613.244898 units or 0.006 lot size. That is if we were finding the position size.
So, my point is, what if I wanted to find the pips at risk instead of position size? The reason is I want it to be a perfect unit or lot, like 600 units instead of 613 units we got from the calculation above.
I did the calculations and got 5 pips?? (I got that by dividing 0.0005 divided by 0.0001) does it indicate that the position size would include a pipette? Based on the 49 pips we set on the first example?? And if we did the same thing with 49 pips we'd be getting 4.9...so does that mean 4 is a pip and 9 is a pipette? Or am i missing something?
Sorry for any vocabulary or grammatical errors in advance, english isn't my first language:)
submitted by Ayman_Rocco980 to Forex [link] [comments]

How to determine stop loss and take profit?

I am working on an algorithmic intraday forex trading system (trades at most a few times per day per pair) but I am having trouble determining a stop loss and take profit when I enter a trade. Does anyone know of a mathematical concept to calculate a SL and TP based on things like the standard deviation of the last n periods? In my backtest I used a fixed value of 20 pips stop loss and 30 take profit but there must be a better way!
submitted by cas210599 to Forex [link] [comments]

Need some legitimate risk management advice

Brand new to forex, after messing around with stocks and ETFs for a year on robinhood.
In trying to learn about this strange new world, seemingly every article warns me that trading forex is the fastest route to poverty, that I'll lose every dime I have and that I'm better off buying lottery tickets, UNLESS I have a risk management plan.
That's all good and well, but it seems hard to find suggestions on how to actually manage my risk. So far what I have found is either unconvincing, or I just flat don't understand what is being explained. So I've landed here.
Reading the Forex FAQ, in this sub, the advice is to use a very small amount of capital when starting off, and practice live trading from there. If then recommends a formula to use in order to calculate risk, which seems like quite a bit of running calculations for every single trade that I make. Is it really the case that every Forex Trader that manages risk runs a series of calculations for each and every trade in order to figure out pip value and leverage amount, such matter and what have you?
Second problem, before even getting to the risk management section of this Subs FAQ, I'm told to read The Beginner's Guide on baby Pips. Babypips says that when you first start off trading you should not start small because then you will never be able to weather times of drawdown. They recommend something like an initial deposit of $20,000 or 50,000, and saying that if you don't have that much then build up your savings and come back the Forex when you have that to drop into the market. Are you kidding me?
My original plan before reading either of those guides was to deposit $300 and use something like a 10 to 1 or 20 to 1 Leverage.
The part that I'm hung up on which really baffles me and I need some help understanding is everywhere seems to say that I should only risk one or 2% of my account. I don't really understand what that means.
My trading app, OandA allows me to set default trade settings. One of them is trade size, which I can select an option "%Lev NAV" In all of my general Trading I have kept this number at 100, assuming that it is simply using 100% of my account for each trade.
I am also using a system in order to Define very specific entry points with a one-to-one risk reward ratio, setting a stop loss and take profit Target, usually between 9 and 60 Pips in size, depending on the instrument. Thus far, each trade that I have won usually amounts to a 3 to 8% change in the demo account value, which seems comprable to what I was experiencing with stocks and ETFs back on Robinhood. For the last 4 trades I've made, I'm up 15%.
Do I need to adjust this % Lev NAV down to 1% instead of 100? Or do I really need to download a pip value calculator app and make a determination after solving some arithmetic? I just can't seem to figure this out, and different sources use the same words interchangeably yet differently. When risking 1% of my account, does that include leverage, or not, in the trade? And if the most anyone recommends to risk in a trade is 1-2% then why use leverage at all? Won't the returns on 1% be so small as to be negligible? I don't seem to understand how it could possibly be Worth while to spend all that time trading... 1℅ of $300 is three bucks. As I understand it, that would allow me to buy 2 units of the EUUSD... there's no way that could be right, right?
Thanks for your patience and for reading this whole, chapter-length, question of a post.
I look forward to some clarity. I don't know how to switch to live trading, and the demo account does nothing to simulate leverage.
submitted by rm-rf_iniquity to Forex [link] [comments]

My experience with forex signals!


Hi my name is D and I have used multiple forex signal providers in the past and I would like to share my experience with the community in the hopes of warning others to wisely pick a signal provider and not burn their hard earned money like I did. ( I know this post is long but please give it a read before you start trading with any signal providers.)
So what made me start following signal providers? I had friends who were trading the forex market by themselves and making profits. I wanted to be like them however I was too impatient. I did not have the confidence to enter trades based on my own analysts as I was still in the learning stages but I still wanted to make some money from forex.
I started my search on instagram to find my first forex signal provider. It was then that I started my year long journey of subscribing to a signal provider and then switching to another one when the previous one was not profitable. (No. I did not switch provider right after a month as I believe every trader has bad months. I had multiple accounts to enter different signals from multiple providers.) After about a year, most of my accounts were down and I told myself I had to put a stop to this senseless burning of money.
I risk 2% for every trade no matter the size of my SL and TP. SL of 20 pips with TP of 40 pips? 2%. SL of 50 pips with TP of 100 pips? 2%. My lot size will just be smaller. Every profitable trader will agree that risk management is everything and is what keeps you in the game in the long run.
Over the many months I have collated the data and managed to pinpoint the exact reasons why my accounts were in a deficit even when the signal provider will show that it was a profitable month. There will be 5 reasons that I will be covering and I hope you take note of each one because if you see a signal provider doing one or more of these, it is a huge red flag that you will not be profitable if you follow it.
  1. Every post is showing off their lavish lifestyle and saying you should quit your 9-5 job
This is a huge huge red flag that the provider is not genuine. Real traders know that forex is not some get rich quick scheme and it takes months, even years of hardwork to start seeing results. They are trying to sell you a dream that you can get rich right away just by purchasing their signal package lol. Looking back, I realise that their analysts was total crap probably because they spent most of their time flexing on their gram. Genuine traders do not have to be such a douche about things as they know the value they offer and do not have to resort to such means to get attention.
  1. Bad risk reward ratio
Risk and reward ratio is everything. If your RR is 1:2. You only need to hit take profit 33% of the time to break even. 1:3? 25%, even better. Any percentage higher and you would be making money. Some signal providers only send trades with RR of maybe 1:1, some even lower than that. This means you have to hit take profit 50% of the time to break even. That is honestly pretty hard to do. So not only do you not make money, you end up losing.
  1. Setting multiple take profits
This is the biggest scam ever and how I was so stupid to not notice it sooner annoys me. Firstly, there is nothing wrong setting multiple take profits to secure some $$ first. However these providers do it in a way that makes it seem their week was profitable while in reality it was not. So let me show you how the maths works. I found an example of one of these trades from a provider I was once subscribed to. ( I have added in the number of pips from entry to save you from the calculations)
BUY XXXXXX NOW @ 1.59650 Sl: 1.59300 (35 pips) Tp1: 1.59822 (17.2 pips) Tp2: 1.60000 (35 pips) Tp3: 1.60200 (55 pips) Tp4: 1.60600 (95 pips) Tp5: 1.61000 (135 pips)
Wow! Looks good doesn't it. Nope it is actually not. Lets break it down. For calculation purposes assume that I risked 5% of my account for the entire trade. I would have to open 5 different positions, each risking 1% of my account. No now lets assume best case scenario and all the trades hit take profit, this is how much account growth I would have in total.
Tp1: 0.49% Tp2: 1% Tp3: 1.57% Tp4: 2.71% Tp5: 3.85%
Total of 9.62%!! Wow not too bad right almost a 1:2 RR. However this is rarely (almost never) the case. In reality it does not often hit TP 5, normally TP 3 and if you are lucky TP 4. In the case of TP 3 your RR would be negative. This factored in with not knowing when to set your SL to entry and having little clue when to actually take profit as TP 4 and TP 5 is unlikely you will be left with a huge drawdown.
So now for the best part. How forex signal providers make it seem that they are profitable. Lets say this trade hits SL, never mind its just a 35 pip loss, dont sweat it. Hits TP3 ... wow! 107 pip gain!!! (17.2+35+55) What a good trade! Yup you risked 5% for a 3% gain, nice one. Now you understand how people get scammed by those forex gurus posting huge pip gains and little losses, PIP GAIN DOES NOT EQUAL PROFITABILITY DO NOT BE FOOLED
  1. Unrealistic RR
Constant signals of RR of 1:4 and higher?? Sign me up please. Yup some providers do this and once the trade is entered they tell you price looks like it is about to retrace blah blah blah and ask you to close it at 1:0.5. A well known forex signal provider still does this but no name shall be mentioned. Worst still etc. you risked 100 pips for "400pips". And the provider celebrates that you caught at least 50 pips! 50 pips is a lot if your risk is maybe 15 pips, but you risked 100? No please that was terrible.
  1. Not caring that different currencies have different pip sizes
For example GBPAUD EURUSD have completely different pip sizes, great you are 60 pips up in GBPAUD and down 45 in EURUSD, still 15 pips in profit! Nope, lets assume you opened 1 lot for each trade, you will be up $410usd for GBPAUD and down $450usd for EURUSD. It is a totaly unnecessary gamble hoping that the trades with a bigger pip value will be up. One way to "counter" this to calculate it such that each pip value is the same. Lets say you want 1 pip to be 1USD, for GBPAUD it will be a 0.145 lot size, for EURUSD 0.1.
These are the reasons why a reliable signal provider is extremely hard to find and instead of earning some money quickly you will find yourself in a hole and in the cycle of changing signal providers. I personally feel it is better to spend your money learning forex and strategies from courses provided online and eventually trade by yourself. The key in forex is patience, having a good risk to reward ratio and full faith in your strategy.
If you have made it this far, I would like to thank you for taking your time to read my first reddit post. I hope you found it informative and please leave some feedback!
Help to share this post to prevent others from being scammed by forex”gurus”!!
submitted by FX_D4N to Forex [link] [comments]

Defining PIP in Forex Trading

If you are interested in forex trading and don’t know where to start, then you are at the right place to learn about forex trading. In this series of blogs, I will be discussing couple of basic terms to know before diving into forex trading. One of the most commonly used term in forex is “ https://bizztrade.com/ ” or known otherwise as “Point in Percentage”. We shall look into detail what exactly is PIP, how can it be calculated and what is its benefits in forex trading.
Defining PIP
In forex, fluctuations of currency prices are quite minor and thus, they are measured in decimal points. A pip is considered as an incremental price movement with specific value dependent on the forex market. This standardized size of pip protects investors with huge losses.
In some cases, a pip consists of the fourth decimal point of a price that is equal to 1/100th of 1%. For example, if EUR / USD moves from 1.07172 to 1.07182 then the difference in the rise in value which is 0.0001 USD equals to 1 pip.
Defining Pipette
Many brokers quote the value of pips in “5 and 3” rather than “2 and 4” which denotes the pip values in a fraction. These fraction values are called pipettes. Each fractional pip equals to “one tenth of a pip”. Each value of the pip or pipette will differ based on the currency that the investotrader has opened in. In a way, we can say that a pip value enables us to calculate the profit and loss before diving in to forex trading.
Calculation of PIP
PIP values varies based on the currency pairs that you are trading in. It also depends on the base currency and counter currency. The pip value is calculate via the simple formula as shown below:
(size of a pip) x (base currency) = PIP value
Another example of understanding what a pip value is that if GBP/USD moves from 1.30542 to 1.30543, then the 0.00001 USD increase is 1 pip value.
Lets look at another example which denotes the calculation of PIP value in forex trading. We will consider the example of USD/JPY. In this case, the value of PIP depends on the exchange rate of USD/JPY.
Suppose that the buy price for USD/JPY is 106.20 and the lot size is 10,000, using the above mentioned formula, the value of the pip will be 0.94 USD. Likewise, if you buy 10,000 USD at the rate of 106.20 yen and you earn $0.94 for every pip value increase. If you sold that same pip at 106.40 yen, then you gain profit of $18.80 but if you sold at 106.00, then you will lose $18.80.
Now that you have understood what exactly is pip and pipette and how to calculate the value of pip before diving deeper into the world of forex trading, be very careful before investing money into money into currency where fluctuation levels are minimal in order to avoid losing your money.
submitted by emilyclark10 to u/emilyclark10 [link] [comments]

Forex Education and Currency Trading

If you have ever traveled abroad or have been gifted foreign currency from friends or family, then you must be quite familiar with exchanging the currency for your local currency. Forex Trading, also known as foreign exchange, is the process of transferring currency between two interested parties at an agreed price. Currency exchange is important for conducting foreign trading and business.
Forex Education is important for investors interested in Forex Trading. Before Forex Trading, it is important to understand the core concepts and knowledge area to understand how forex trading works. It also helps to apply knowledge to focus areas to carry out important trading activities. Forex Education provides helpful information for traders to apply optimal solutions. With solid information about Forex Trading, traders can easily apply the knowledge as well as tips and tricks received from Forex Education.

Basic Terms to Know in Forex Trading

1. Pip

In the world of forex trading, PIP stands for ‘Percentage in Point’ which stands for measure of exchange rate movement. A PIP is a single float value that measures the profit and loss. A single PiP value equals 0.0001.

2. Spread

A spread is the difference between the pip value of the asking price of an asset. It is important for a forex trader to understand what a spread is. To calculate the spread value, calculate the difference between the buying and selling price.

3. Leverage

Leverage is the amount of loan allowed to traders to access larger sums of trading capitals. This loan amount is also called margins. Leverage is very important as it can increase or decrease the profits and losses therefore, leverage should be considered wisely.

4. Margins

Margin is referred to as minimum amount of collateral or deposit that a trader has while trading. It is a required amount that is needed for trading. The leverage ratio determines the amount of margin that is needed for a trade.

5. Volume

There are two types of volume values used in forex trading. First is the volume with respect to order which refers to the volumes of buying and selling. The second volume refers to the tick volumes where it counts the times the volume has changed over a specific period.

6. Slippage

Slippage refers to a slight difference in the price you expect and the execution price. This can occur through market volatility and execution speeds.
There are a number of courses, MOOCs and masterclasses available over the internet to understand how Forex Trading works and which allows the traders to learn the tips and tricks of forex trading. One of the best platform for forex education is
  1. Bizztrade
In conclusion, there are lots of other forex education material available over the internet for aspiring traders to study and understand the meaning of forex education and what are the best practices to apply when stepping into the world of trading.
submitted by emilyclark10 to u/emilyclark10 [link] [comments]

Please take a look at how I calculated my SL and TP, is this correct?

Please take a look at how I calculated my SL and TP, is this correct?
Hello guys! I started learning forex not too long ago, and I have also recently opened a demo account. Placed my first trade with no real consideration of profit or loss, managed to make a profit. However, I wanted to understand what I am doing in totality. Long story short, after hours of jumping from article to article scrapping together information and revisiting courses, I have finally "theoretically" understood how to calculate risk. Despite all this, however, my TP and SL lines are not visible for some reason. I don't know what the cause might be, but hopefully you guys can help me out, first of all, by helping me understand if I did calculate everything right or perhaps made a mistake:
My demo account had around 50k usd, but I wanted to base my trade on a 1000$ account, so:
1000/100= 10$ We can risk to lose 10 dollars at most
using a volume(lot size) of 0.01(meaning that each pip are 0.10cents) we conclude that ===> 10$/0.10cents = 100 pips. We can set our stoploss at the entry price -100 .
We are trading EUUSD, and enter with a buy order:
the EURO had the price of 1.1002(I think we calculate our entry price with the BASE currency which is the euro, this is really important as I remember that we consider our entry price based on the base currency, not the quoted one-- right?)
1.1002-100 = 1.0902 ==>stop loss
As for our take profit, I decided a 130 pip increase(for no reason as I am focusing on the calculation, not the strategy)
1.1002+130 = 1.1132 ==>Take profit
I entered with a buy order, but apparently I can not even see my TP and SL.

UPDATE
Update!!: I literally figured out why I could not see my SL and TP!!:) I think it was because the EURO has not yet even reached the buy price(the blue chart represents the value it currently is, clearly lower than the entry). But now it leads me to question, how did this happen? Did the market spike as I placed the command, or did I not calculate something right? Did I leave something out? If someone could help me out, I would really appreciate it, thank you!

https://preview.redd.it/jiw68zijsno31.png?width=1920&format=png&auto=webp&s=573178d28f2ca5c7f4871c0d2d140d3b4fa89d88
seriously, how did that happen? I entered with a buy command at 1.1002 and it literally had no time to be placed. This really seems like something that can really rarely happen, unless I am truly a dummy and something has been messed up.
UPDATE: I have almost managed to fully understand every aspect of profit, loss, and pips. I'll perhaps follow up with a post for others once I fully comprehend it, perhaps they can use it and get over all the frustration of a beginner.
submitted by AlexSimply to Forex [link] [comments]

Metatrader says that the 5th decimal equals 1 pip, this is madness

Metatrader says that the 5th decimal equals 1 pip, this is madness
Update: I have managed to figure out my own mistake, after painful hours of reading articles, head banging, and doubting my existence. The articles on the MT crosshair state that the second value is a representation of points, and not pips, but I clearly commited a mistake by not reading over all of them. So if you are a beginner, take this as a word of advice, I paid with blood and sweat for this little mistake(mostly a lack of sleep). If you want to keep reading, feel free to, my mistake is also exemplified and explained in further detail.
Hello guys, I have a really important and probably easy problem that I do not seem to be able to figure out. Today is the last day of the week, and I've been crunching forex tutorials for the past 5 days like a madman trying to understand as much as I can before my university year starts. But on the last day, I have a really frustrating problem:
I decide to buy EUUSD with a lot size of 0.01(micro lots)
Entry price: 1.0972 (I leave the pipette out, as I've learned that it is not so significant)
Take profit 50 pips above: 1.0972+ 0.0050 -These are 50 pips, I am totally sure of that ===> TP= 1.0972
HOWEVER: When I look at the chart with my crosshair and measure 50 pips, the TP= 1.0927 WTF? What am I leaving out from my calculations? I am sure someone more experienced could easily tell me what's wrong, but I don't get it, why does 50 pips equal 1.0927 instead of 72? The 4th number is 1 PIP, and the 5th is a pipette. So what's wrong? It says 50 pips equal a change in the 4th decimal, but that is impossible, right? The 4th decimal is 1 pip, not 10!!
If I was to speculate an answer, I would say that the 5th decimal in metatrader is considered 1 pip? But why? The 5th decimal is always a pipette, right??? But IF I MEASURE IT, a change in the 5th decimal equals 1 pip in the crosshair!
What's going on here? Is there something the tutorials did not cover? I can practically just change my calculation a bit but I wonder what is going on here? I've literally stayed up all night wondering why my orders were missing the SL and TP just to zoom out and see my take profit in heaven and the stop loss in the 9th circle of hell, right under my table. If someone could clear up as of what is going on, I would greatly appreciate it!

UPDATE: After bouncing back and forth a few articles, I have realized something extremely infuriating. The MT4 crosshair shows points, and they need to be divided by 10 in order to get the actual pips!

https://preview.redd.it/a1gd14cco2p31.png?width=1920&format=png&auto=webp&s=18669616ae7257e7a2e2fab51bb2cba0f4818da0
Reading the forexpeacearmy article, it first states that the second value are pips, and under it, it states that they are actually 90.1 pips and not 901 pips. This is something someone can very easily look over, mostly if they are a newbie!

https://preview.redd.it/zu2zoa8qo2p31.png?width=1920&format=png&auto=webp&s=1ec334b1ac545d1b53fbf2c68a1c8cd2f833988a
submitted by AlexSimply to Forex [link] [comments]

My experience with forex signals.

Hi my name is D and I have used multiple forex signal providers in the past and I would like to share my experience with the community in the hopes of warning others to wisely pick a signal provider and not burn their hard earned money like I did. ( I know this post is long but please give it a read before you start trading with any signal providers.)
So what made me start following signal providers? I had friends who were trading the forex market by themselves and making profits. I wanted to be like them however I was too impatient. I did not have the confidence to enter trades based on my own analysts as I was still in the learning stages but I still wanted to make some money from forex.
I started my search on instagram to find my first forex signal provider. It was then that I started my year long journey of subscribing to a signal provider and then switching to another one when the previous one was not profitable. (No. I did not switch provider right after a month as I believe every trader has bad months. I had multiple accounts to enter different signals from multiple providers.) After about a year, most of my accounts were down and I told myself I had to put a stop to this senseless burning of money. Today , I am proud to say that I am able to trade by myself profitably.
I risk 2% for every trade no matter the size of my SL and TP. SL of 20 pips with TP of 40 pips? 2%. SL of 50 pips with TP of 100 pips? 2%. My lot size will just be smaller. Every profitable trader will agree that risk management is everything and is what keeps you in the game in the long run.
Over the many months I have collated the data and managed to pinpoint the exact reasons why my accounts were in a deficit even when the signal provider will show that it was a profitable month. There will be 5 reasons that I will be covering and I hope you take note of each one because if you see a signal provider, it is a huge red flag that you will not be profitable if you follow it.
  1. Every post is showing off their lavish lifestyle and saying you should quit your 9-5 job
This is a huge huge red flag that the provider is not genuine. Real traders know that forex is not some get rich quick scheme and it takes months, even years of hardwork to start seeing results. They are trying to sell you a dream that you can get rich right away just by purchasing their signal package lol. Looking back, I realise that their analysts was total crap probably because they spent most of their time flexing on their gram. Genuine traders do not have to be such a douche about things as they know the value they offer and do not have to resort to such means to get attention.
  1. Bad risk reward ratio
Risk and reward ratio is everything. If your RR is 1:2. You only need to hit take profit 33% of the time to break even. 1:3? 25%, even better. Any percentage higher and you would be making money. Some signal providers only send trades with RR of maybe 1:1, some even lower than that. This means you have to hit take profit 50% of the time to break even. That is honestly pretty hard to do. So not only do you not make money, you end up losing.
  1. Setting multiple take profits
This is the biggest scam ever and how I was so stupid to not notice it sooner annoys me. Firstly, there is nothing wrong setting multiple take profits to secure some $$ first. However these providers do it in a way that makes it seem their week was profitable while in reality it was not. So let me show you how the maths works. I found an example of one of these trades from a provider I was once subscribed to. ( I have added in the number of pips from entry to save you from the calculations)
BUY XXXXXX NOW @ 1.59650 Sl: 1.59300 (35 pips) Tp1: 1.59822 (17.2 pips) Tp2: 1.60000 (35 pips) Tp3: 1.60200 (55 pips) Tp4: 1.60600 (95 pips) Tp5: 1.61000 (135 pips)
Wow! Looks good doesn't it. Nope it is actually not. Lets break it down. For calculation purposes assume that I risked 5% of my account for the entire trade. I would have to open 5 different positions, each risking 1% of my account. No now lets assume best case scenario and all the trades hit take profit, this is how much account growth I would have in total.
Tp1: 0.49% Tp2: 1% Tp3: 1.57% Tp4: 2.71% Tp5: 3.85%
Total of 9.62%!! Wow not too bad right almost a 1:2 RR. However this is rarely (almost ever) the case. In reality it does not often hit TP 5, normally TP 3 and if you are lucky TP 4. In the case of TP 3 your RR would be negative. This factored in with not knowing when to set your SL to entry and having little clue when to actually take profit as TP 4 and TP 5 is highly you will be left with a huge drawdown.
So now for the best part. How forex signal providers make it seem that they are profitable. Lets say this trade hits SL, never mind its just a 35 pip loss, dont sweat it. Hits TP3 ... wow! 107 pip gain!!! (17.2+35+55) What a good trade! Yup you risked 5% for a 3% gain, nice one. Now you understand how people get scammed by those forex gurus posting huge pip gains and little losses, PIP GAIN DOES NOT EQUAL PROFITABILITY DO NOT BE FOOLED
  1. Unrealistic RR
Constant signals of RR of 1:4 and higher?? Sign me up please. Yup some providers do this and once the trade is entered they tell you price looks like it is about to retrace blah blah blah and ask you to close it at 1:0.5. A well known forex signal provider still does this but no name shall be mentioned. Worst still etc. you risked 100 pips for "400pips". And the provider celebrates that you caught at least 50 pips! 50 pips is a lot if your risk is maybe 15 pips, but you risked 100? No please that was terrible.
  1. Not caring that different currencies have different pip sizes
For example GBPAUD EURUSD have completely different pip sizes, great you are 60 pips up in GBPAUD and down 45 in EURUSD, still 15 pips in profit! Nope, lets assume you opened 1 lot for each trade, you will be up $410usd for GBPAUD and down $450usd for EURUSD. It is a totaly unnecessary gamble hoping that the trades with a bigger pip value will be up. One way to "counter" this to calculate it such that each pip value is the same. Lets say you want 1 pip to be 1USD, for GBPAUD it will be a 0.145 lot size, for EURUSD 0.1.
These are the reasons why a reliable signal provider is extremely hard to find and instead of earning some money quickly you will find yourself in a hole and in the cycle of changing signal providers. I personally feel it is better to spend your money learning forex and strategies from courses provided online and eventually trade by yourself. The key in forex is patience, having a good risk to reward ratio and full faith in your strategy.
If you have made it this far, I would like to thank you for taking your time to read my first reddit post. I hope you found it informative and please leave some feedback!
submitted by FX_D4N to u/FX_D4N [link] [comments]

Lot Size Calculator

Calculating lot sizes to risk a set amount of risk can be tricky sometimes, especially when you are new. Different currency pairs have different values per pip (L2A) and it takes some time to get to know them all.
There are some general rules of thumb (L2A) you can follow to get decent estimates but it is better to be able to be precise in your position sizing.
Myfxbook have a great tool for this. You can enter into it your account size, the percentage you want to risk (L2A) and the number of pips in your stop loss. Then it will tell you the lot size, along with the dollar risk.


https://preview.redd.it/g691olkxjy421.png?width=844&format=png&auto=webp&s=f9c66e1c0c88e4e6571b96b689b507acac995781

The tool is simple and intuitive to use. You can get it here.

This is just one of the many free trading tools/resources Myfxbook offers. (L2A)

L2A = Link to be added.
submitted by inweedwetrust to Forexnoobs [link] [comments]

How To Trade Forex

How To Trade Forex

How To Trade Forex
Learn The Basics |Advanced Topics | Chart Patterns | Choose The Best Broker
Beware of scam companies! Trade only with a good licensed broker that holds an FCA or ASIC license like these.

USE A BROKER THAT PROVIDES 0.0 pips Spreads and 500:1 Leverage for better trading!
OPEN A DEMO ACCOUNT | OPEN A LIVE ACCOUNT

How does Forex Work?

Forex trading is the simultaneous buying of one currency and selling of another…
Read more

Basic Terminology

Before trading currencies, an investor has to understand the basic terminology of the forex market…
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Fundamental Analysis

Fundamental analysis is the study of the overall economic, financial, political…
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Technical Analysis

Technical analysis is the study of prices over time, with charts being the primary tool…
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Trend Lines

The term ‘trend’ describes the current direction of the financial instrument…
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What is a Technical Indicator

Technical Indicators are a result of mathematical calculations/algorithms…
Read more

Gold Trading

As an investment, gold is the most popular of the precious metals…
Read more

Order Types

A market order is an order to open a buy or sell position at…
Read more

We complete our education centre with a breakdown of Gold Trading and details of the different Order Types.
You can also review our glossary to find brief definitions of various trading and financial terms you may encounter.
Once you have familiarised yourself with the information and concepts, you can open a Demo Trading Account to practice what you have learnt and build on your knowledge and understanding of how to trade successfully. Treat your demo account as you would your real account.
Aprender a operar con Forex | Lernen Sie Forex zu handeln

  1. What is Forex? Think the stock market is huge? Think again. Learn about the LARGEST financial market in the world and how to trade in it.
    1. What Is Forex?Learn about this massively huge financial market where fiat currencies are traded.
    2. What Is Traded In Forex?Currencies are the name of the game. Yes, you can buy and sell currencies against each other as a short-term trade, long-term investment, or something in-between.
    3. Buying And Selling Currency PairsThe first thing that you need to know about forex trading is that currencies are traded in pairs; you can’t buy or sell a currency without another.
    4. Forex Market Size And LiquidityThe Forex market is yuuuuuuuggggeeee! And that comes with a lot of benefits for currency traders!
    5. The Different Ways To Trade ForexSome of the more popular ways that traders participate in the forex market is through the spot market, futures, options, and exchange-traded funds.
  2. Why Trade Forex? Want to know some reasons why traders love the forex market? Read on to find out what makes it so attractive!
    1. Why Trade Forex: Advantages Of Forex TradingLow transaction costs and high liquidity are just a couple of the advantages of the forex market.
    2. Why Trade Forex: Forex vs. StocksNobody likes bullies! Good thing for us, unlike the stock market, there is no one financial institute large enough to corner the forex market!
    3. Why Trade Forex: Forex vs. FuturesThe futures market trades a puny $30 billion per day. Thirty billion? Peanuts compared to the FIVE TRILLION that is traded daily in the forex market!
  3. Who Trades Forex? From money exchangers, to banks, to hedge fund managers, to local Joes like your Uncle Pete – everybody participates in the forex market!
    1. Forex Market StructureBecause there is no centralized market, tight competition between banks normally leads to having the best prices! Boo yeah!
    2. Forex Market PlayersThe forex market is basically comprised of four different groups.
    3. Know Your Forex History!If it wasn’t for the Bretton Woods System (and the great Al Gore), there would be no retail forex trading! Time to brush up on your history!
  4. When Can You Trade Forex? Now that you know who participates in the forex market, it’s time to learn when you can trade!
    1. Forex Trading SessionsJust because the forex market is open 24 hours a day doesn’t mean it’s always active! See how the forex market is broken up into four major trading sessions and which ones provides the most opportunities.
    2. When Can You Trade Forex: Tokyo SessionGodzilla, Nintendo, and sushi! What’s not to like about Tokyo?!? The Tokyo session is sometimes referred to as the Asian session, which is also the session where we start fresh every day!
    3. When Can You Trade Forex: London SessionNot only is London the home of Big Ben, David Beckham, and the Queen, but it’s also considered the forex capital of the world–raking in about 30% of all forex transactions every day!
    4. When Can You Trade Forex: New York SessionNew York baby! The concrete jungle where forex dreams are made of! Just like Asia and Europe, the U.S. is considered one of the top financial centers in the world, so it definitely sees its fair share of action–and then some!
    5. Best Times of Day to Trade ForexTrading is all about volatility and liquidity. Which times of day provide the most dynamic market action and volumes?
    6. Best Days of the Week to Trade ForexEach trader should know when to trade and when NOT to trade. Read on to find out the best and worst times to trade.
  5. How Do You Trade Forex? Now, it’s time to learn HOW to rake in the moolah!
    1. How to Make Money Trading ForexJust like any other market: buy low and sell high…and vice versa. Simple, right!?
    2. Know When to Buy or Sell a Currency PairLet’s start with the very basics. First, what drives the value of a currency?
    3. What is a Pip in Forex?You’ve probably heard of the terms “pips,” “pipettes,” and “lots” thrown around, and here we’re going to explain what they are and show you how their values are calculated.
    4. What is a Lot in Forex?How many units of currency can we trade? What size positions can we trade and what are they called?
    5. Impress Your Date with Forex LingoWanna impress your crush? Here are some forex terms to help you wow that special someone!
    6. Types of Forex Orders“Would you like pips with that?” Okay, not that type of order, but buying and selling currencies can be just as simple with a little practice.
    7. Demo Trade Your Way to SuccessCurrency market behavior is constantly evolving. Trade on demo first to get a lot of the rookie mistakes out of the way before risking live capital. There are no take-backs in the real market.
    8. Forex Trading is NOT a Get-Rich-Quick SchemeWhile possible if you’re a trading genius with ice in your veins and you’re luckier than a lottery winner, building wealth through trading takes time and practice to build the skills and experience needed to be successful.
📷
Via XNTRADES.com
Topics Which Every Trader Must Master.
Or at least know your Chart Patterns
Support and Resistance v.1
Support and Resistance v.2
Elliot Waves Theory
Elliott Waves 101
Harmonic Patterns
Chart Patterns
How to Trade Market Structure
More educational materials from TRESORFX.com and XNTRADES.com

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OPEN A DEMO ACCOUNT | OPEN A LIVE ACCOUNT


submitted by TRESORFX to u/TRESORFX [link] [comments]

Beginners question - Understanding leverage and margin

Hi all, I recently started studying forex around 6 months and been working through lots of info and onto simulation and live demo the past few months. I am following a strategy using the 1,3,60 minute timeframes which I have started to see some consistent results and profited well however I am still struggling to get my head around how leverage and margin works.

Currently the demo account I am using is calculating correctly as per the position size and pip values I am entering but I am still struggling to understand exactly how leverage and margin is working when I am entering positions.

EXAMPLE TRADE
Account balance - £5000 Risk - 1% (£50)
Entry - 1.28058 Stop loss - 1.28008 (5 pips) Position Size (units) - 128,058 Pip value - £10

The platform I am using, I enter 128,058 units as the trade value. If I get stopped out fully, then I lose 1% (£50) of my account which is correct.

I am hoping somebody can help me understand how my £5000 account is purchasing this position size with leverage and also the margin amount. What is the risk involved and how to avoid/calculate the movement needed for a margin call with this account size.

NOTE: I will only be entering 1 trade at a time which usually last on average 15 minutes maximum and will be done like the example above and always be 1% of my account size as risk each time.

Although I have been in profit, I am concerned if I was to make a live account and the requirements are different therefore acts differently to my demo account. I would like to understand this fully before moving on.

Thanks in advance



submitted by Mattthuk to Forex [link] [comments]

How to Trade Forex | How to Start Forex?

Trading foreign exchange on the currency market also called trading forex, can be a moving hobby and a great source of income rather than others platform. To put it into perspective, the securities market trades over $22.4 billion per day; the forex market trades more than $5 trillion per day.
You can trade forex online in multiple ways:-

1.Understanding forex terminology.

2.Read a forex quote

You'll see two numbers on a forex quote: the bid price on the left and the asking price on the right.

3. Decide what currency you want to buy and sell

4. Learn how to calculate profits

submitted by BestECNbrokers to u/BestECNbrokers [link] [comments]

Broker Pivot Trade. Trading with best forex indicator. Low spread EUR/USD 0.9-1.1. 50% Deposit bonus. Awards.

Broker Pivot Trade. Low spread EUUSD 0.9-1.1. 50% Deposit bonus. Pivot Trade Awards.
Website: https://www.pivottrade.com Awards: https://pivottrade.com/About/awards.html
Download indicator: https://en.mt4trading.ru/downloads/87.5_indicator.rar
Trading with best forex indicator.

+ Best forex indicator 2017, 2018. 87,5% accuracy. No repaint alerts + SMS signals for trading mt4. INFO - https://en.mt4trading.ru.
Download indicator: https://en.mt4trading.ru/downloads/87.5_indicator.rar

Pivot Trade has received many awards for outstanding achievements in the Forex Industry. Outstanding customer support, excellent platforms, fund security and dedicated services are the greatest values of Pivot Trade.

Hi I am Alexander. Today I am going to do a broker review that many people are curious about. So far, many of you guys have asked me to recommend a broker. I hope this video helps those people who have not yet chosen a broker. To explain you guys with the advantages and disadvantages of this broker, I have been trading in this broker for. I'll tell you what I have felt about trading here.

The name of the broker is called Pivot Trade. Perhaps you might not have heard of them if you have been trading Forex for a long time. This Broker was originally an asset management company and they used to ONLY worked with companies. But they opened to the individuals for the first time in 2016 by making a broker called Pivot Trade. Okay I’ve gone too much of talking, now, I will show you what I have done through last week.

Spread Low - The first thing I noticed while I traded in Pivot Trade is that the spread is low. I will explain why it is really important to choose a broker with low spread. Basically, the movement of 1pip per lot is worth $ 10. Depending on your order, you may earn or lose $ 10. However, on the Forex trading system, we always start with a loss as much as the price of the spread. In other words, if you place a buy order, you will start from the bottom graph price, and if you place a sell order, you will start from the top graph price. That’s why spread is one of the most important factors in choosing a broker.

I will do a calculation from a money point of view. At Pivot Trade, EUR / USD is about 0.9-1.1, so we will calculate it as roughly 1pip. If you are trading at 1.5pip on another broker, there is a spread difference of 0.5pip, is it correct? Then you will have to pay an additional $ 5 for each order you do. If you trade 500 lots a month, then you would lose $5x500 = $ 2500 each month. This is not some amount of money you would want to ignore. Please, everyone who is watching this video, choose a broker with a lower spread.

But you should also be noted that brokers have a lot of false ads. If you check some websites of a broker, it says spread starts from 0.1 pip/0.3pip or what so ever, which is actually not a real spread. This spread only reaches the point for less than a second a day. Many brokers now have a zero spread account, the actual spread is zero, but they receive additional commissions. For example, the spread is 0, but the commission is from $ 20.

Deposit Bonus Withdrawal - Second, I have been working with Forex for a long time, but Pivot trade seems to offer this service to our customers for the first time. Personally, I like this most. You may have heard of Deposit Bonus. However, at Pivot Trade it is very easy to withdraw.

Pivot Trade now offers a 50% deposit bonus up to $ 5000. The Deposit Bonus is added as credit, not as real money. This money is converted into a withdrawable balance of $ 3 for each 1 lot transaction. I have asked the customer service, and they said that bonus will be converted into balance once a week. For example, if you have traded 15 lots this week, $ 45 of the bonus can be withdrawn immediately.

They received the highest customer satisfaction award in year 2018. You can also see there are few more awards they have received.

In conclusion, I am very satisfied that they have low spread. Additionally, the deposit bonus which can be withdrawn even if you trade one lot, is very competitive and seems to be a very good promotion for traders to enjoy. Since this broker is also a registered at Financial Service Authority at St. Vincent, it seem that you don’t have to worry about the safety of the fund.

If you have any questions, please contact:
Web-site: https://en.mt4trading.ru
Skype: master.trade.win
Tel.: +7(928)2514977
Email: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected])

Video address: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQA3XWBy6Eo
This video was published on: December 29, 2018.
Channel: https://www.youtube.com/usecomemoneys

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submitted by Mt4Trading to u/Mt4Trading [link] [comments]

Help with my bad Forex assumptions!

I've been reading a little about forex in the past couple weeks, and as a software engineer, I find it appealing that it can be conducted almost entirely via technical analysis (i.e. it's work a computer can do, unlike fundamentals). A lot of folks on here and around the web have talked about their robo-trading, so I figured one of the best ways for me to learn more would be to write an app and experiment with a test account.
Before that, though, I spent ten minutes writing a simulation to test out some of my assumptions, and see if the math checks out. I'm sure most of this will be cleared up with practical experience, but I thought I'd quickly ask for a second opinion before spending days (and hundreds/thousands of lines of code) on the problem.
My plan, tentatively, is to do some automated range trading during Asian hours. Looking at a couple USD/EUR charts to get a feel for how quickly things move, I plugged these values into my "simulation."
With three concurrent positions open and each of them lasting up to two hours, that means the sim is doing ~12 trades per 8-hour day. Targeting a 2:1 profit ratio, that means only 33% of the trades need to be correct in order to break even. If I set it to 35% it makes a tidy profit, and if I crank it up to 50% things start to get a little obscene.
This is all math, but I'm better with an IDE than I am with a calculator. And of course, none of this gets into how to determine where the ranges are -- that's a problem I'll try to solve while writing the actual app.
Before I start writing code... what in there looks totally out of whack? What am I not taking into account? I don't consider the numbers coming out of this shitty little mini-program worthwhile, but it was a fun little experiment, and I found myself curious whether any of it was realistic, or if it needed to be significantly reconfigured. Thanks for any advice.
submitted by macheath77 to Forex [link] [comments]

Pip Value and Profit Calculations How to Calculate Value Per Pip in Forex Standard and Micro ... Forex สอน เทรด : 257 - How to calculate Pip value? (ส่วน ... Episode 88: How To Calculate Pips and Pip Value in Forex ... Get Your Pip Value Calculator (Free) - YouTube

An advanced pip calculator by Investing.com. ... Forex Pip Calculator ... The tool below will give you the value per pip in your account currency, for all major currency pairs. ... The pip value calculator helps forex traders determine the value per pip in their base currency so that they can monitor their risk per trade more accurately. A most useful tool for every trader, our Pip value calculator will help you calculate the value of a pip in the currency you want to trade in. This information is crucial in determining if a trade is worth the risk and in managing said risk appropriately. Pip amount:<br /> <br /> Currency pair:<br /> <br /> Trade size (lots):<br /> <br /> Deposit currency:<br /> Main Currencies Instrument Rate ... Calculate pip value per your trade size with our Forex pip calculator. Pip values for the standard, mini and micro lot are already provided in the pip value table. Please choose your account currency before proceeding, It is set to USD by default. Use our pip and margin calculator to aid with your decision-making while trading forex. Maximum leverage and available trade size varies by product. If you see a tool tip next to the leverage data, it is showing the max leverage for that product. Please contact client services for more information.

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Pip Value and Profit Calculations

Download your Pip Value Calculator here...: https://www.tradingwithrayner.com/pip-value-calculator/ 👇 SUBSCRIBE TO RAYNER'S YOUTUBE CHANNEL NOW 👇 https://www... This video is just a demonstration of how you're going to calculate pip value and convert them easily to your account's currency. To learn more about pips we... How to calculate Forex Trading pip value and get all currency pip value, Micro Lot or volume and mini Lot or valume, and Standard lot size and volume *******... I get asked this question a lot from traders; how do you calculate pips and pip value? Today, I will show you the different pip values and how to calculate t... In this video, you will learn: - What a Pip is and the difference between pips and pipettes. - How to calculate a pip value - How position size affects pip v...

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